Posts Tagged ‘Cooking with friends’

Father’s Day Brunch Recipe: Tortilla Española

Friday, June 13th, 2014 No comments

Father’s day is almost here! One of my all-time favorite dishes to cook up for a Father’s Day is Tortilla Española, also offered as an appetizer in the Spanish Wine Dinner chapter of Cook the Part. This delicious dish is a staple of Spanish cuisine, consisting of egg omelette made with potatoes cooked in olive oil. I hope you enjoy this dish as much as I do.

Tortilla Espanola 1024x682 Fathers Day Brunch Recipe: Tortilla Española

TORTILLA ESPAÑOLA

TORTILLA ESPAÑOLA

Ingredients:

  • 4 tablespoons Spanish olive oil, divided
  • ?4 Yukon Gold potatoes, sliced very thin (Note: Use a mandolin (if available) set at 1/8”)
  • 2 teaspoon kosher salt?1 onion, cut in half and sliced very thin?2 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 6 large eggs
  • 2 teaspoons dry grill rub or seasoning
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • Roasted red pepper strips, purchased or homemade

1) Prepare potatoes for Tortilla Española, sliced about 1/8″ inch thin

2) Heat 2 tablespoons oil in large nonstick skillet on medium-high flame.

3) Add potato slices and sauté for 12 minutes, turning to ensure even cooking.

4) Add another tablespoon oil and 1 teaspoon salt. Reduce flame to medium.

5) Add onions and continue cooking until onions are soft and potatoes are tender, about 5 minutes.

6) ?Add crushed garlic and sauté for 2 minutes.

Turn off flame and set aside.

7) ?Beat eggs with 1 teaspoon salt, rub and pepper in a large bowl.

8) Remove potatoes from skillet, add to egg mixture and let stand for 10 minutes.?Add 1 tablespoon of oil to skillet.

9) Pour egg and potato mixture into heated skillet. ?Allow eggs to set, lifting the sides of the omelet to let more egg mixture run underneath.

10) When the omelet can be lifted from the side of the pan, invert the omelet onto a plate and slide it back into the pan to cook the other side.

11) Add ground pepper to taste.?Slide the cooked omelet onto a cutting board or serving plate and cut into cubes or wedges. This can be served at room temperature. Serve with roasted red peppers strips.

Happy Father’s Day to all the dads out there! Enjoy!

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Simple and Simply Delicious: Italian Baked Chicken

Wednesday, January 15th, 2014 2 comments
Italian Baked Chicken 300x225 Simple and Simply Delicious:  Italian Baked Chicken

Italian Baked Chicken

 

Happy New Year!
This is my first post for 2014 and I was inspired by our recent week in Park City, Utah, where we always cook for our house guests, but try to keep things simple to allow plenty of ski time and time for other local activities. We decided to prepare this 25-year family favorite, which is still appreciated in 2014 as it was in the 1980′s. A few simple ingredients and easy preparation have made this a standby for so many years.

 

 

 

Italian Baked Chicken
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.

5 skinless, boneless chicken breasts (preferably organic), washed, dried and cut in half
2 green peppers, seeded, washed and cut into 6 strips
1 red pepper, seeded, washed and cut into 6 strips
1 yellow pepper, seeded, washed and cut into 6 strips
4 Yukon Gold potatoes, peeled and quartered

Place all ingredients in a large roasting pan (I use a large broiler pan).

Dressing:
2/3 cup olive oil
2 teaspoons oregano
2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
1/2 teaspoon paprika
4-5 large cloves garlic, crushed

Mix dressing ingredients well.

Drizzle dressing over the chicken and vegetables. Bake uncovered, basting frequently with juices for about 1 hour.
Increase temperature to 400 and bake 15 minutes longer to brown.
Arrange on hot platter.
Serve alone or with spaghetti with a marinara sauce and grated Parmesan.

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Venture Into a New Teambuilding Experience with “Cook the Part”

Friday, September 20th, 2013 No comments
Killu Venture Into a New Teambuilding Experience with Cook the Part

Killu Sanborn Organizes VC Cooking Event

By Killu Sanborn

Now this is the way to have a business dinner! The night before BIOCOM VC Day in San Diego, we got a handful of life science investors from San Diego and San Francisco area together to cook a Greek meal. And what a meal it was! Following Karin’s recipes for the team cooking of a Greek dinner, we made far better tasting Greek food from scratch than we ever thought possible in such a short time, and as a group of life science investors who had never cooked together before. – Who knew?!?

How about some homemade pita bread with tzatziki sauce? – No problem! Greek salad? – The best you’ve tasted in a long time…and surprisingly easy to make as a team. Tiropita (did you even know that that is)? – Fresh, warm from the oven, and delicious.

And all this was just the beginning…Now came the grilled lamb chops, roasted asparagus and roasted Greek potatoes with lemon. All turned out so well, legends were born right there and then. To finish the meal, Greek yogurt with caramelized walnuts, dates and honey were just the perfect touch of sweet, sour and crunch.

The whole evening was filled with great joy from cooking together in good company, with plenty of laughter, and savoring the delicious dinner we prepared together. What a fun way to spend an evening – and what great conversations, shop talk and other, can be had over delicious Greek food you’ve just cooked in a group of friends!

Can’t wait to do it again. What a treat!

 

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Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013 No comments

By Bryna Kranzler

Maybe this isn’t how you have fun with your kids, but it is how I do.Last summer, when Jesse was home for a visit, we had a free day together so I broke out a molecular gastronomy kit we had bought, and decided to have fun with it. After watching the video about all the amazing things we could do, we picked a few projects.

First we thought we’d make fruit caviar. So we pureed some peaches and squeezed the grapefruit…

Making Fruit Caviar 300x225 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

then mixed each juice with sodium alginate.

Juice mixed with sodium alginate. 300x225 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

And dropped little pearls of it into a mixture of calcium citrate in water.

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Although Jesse had gotten an A in AP Chemistry, and I had been in Honors Chemistry (back at a time before molecular gastronomy existed and the laws of chemistry were different), it hadn’t occurred to either of us that citric acid (we had added OJ to the peach puree to thin it) might interfere with the ability of sodium alginate to gel.

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So that didn’t work. Or look very appetizing.

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So we decided to make balsamic vinegar caviar. Start by putting a cup of oil into the freezer to chill.

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After heating balsamic vinegar and agar agar, we extrude droplets of it from the syringe that arrived with the kit into the cold oil. It worked!

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This is what Balsamic Caviar looked like when we were done:

Photo 8 300x224 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

So we got more ambitious and decided to make balsamic spaghetti.

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Worked beautifully (even if it looked more like squid ink pasta)

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We set it aside to serve over fresh strawberries. So we mixed some peach puree with agar agar, and that worked, too!

Photo 11 300x225 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

Peach puree spaghetti

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On to the main course: Goat cheese spheres, which we would serve with balsamic spaghetti.
First we blended water and calcium algenate.

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Next, we combined goat cheese with a little milk and calcium lactate, and dropped it into the mixture of water and calcium algenate.

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Voila! Goat cheese spheres with heirloom cherry tomatoes, balsamic spaghetti, olive finishing salt and olive oil.

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But that was only the appetizer and Jesse needed dinner, too. So he sautéed garlic and heirloom cherry tomatoes in olive oil with fennel seed and chilies, then removed them while he sautéed pasta.

Photo 16 300x225 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

Once the pasta browned, he added back the sautéed garlic and heirloom cherry tomatoes.
We finished off dinner (since we’d had the strawberries with balsamic spaghetti for a snack) with a ‘simple’ dessert: Peach spaghetti, fresh raspberries, and one of my homemade cranberry-kumquat-ginger macaroon.

Photo 17 300x225 Creating Great Family Chemistry: Fun with Jesse and Molecular Gastronomy

The process took 6 hours, and was some of the most fun we’ve ever had together.

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